Monday, 6 April 2020

Interview with Bristol-based music producer and DJ Perplex



Bristol-based music producer and DJ Perplex having focused on fine-tuning his production style for several years, Perplex started releasing his songs in 2019. His first release ‘Are You Ready’ released in December 2019 set the stage for what fans can expect from Perplex - hard-hitting dance floor DNB which is showcased in his energetic DJ sets. With a string of releases forthcoming in 2020, Perplex is one to watch.

See our exclusive interview with him below:


Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

Growing up I was really into my heavy metal and used to listen to bands like Metallica and Iron Maiden but quickly fell in love with the dance music scene when I heard Prodigy's albums music for the jilted generation and of course fat of the land. Like many others, I fell in love with DNB when I heard tunes like original nutta and valley of the shadows but what really got me involved with the scene and into DJing and production was Roni Size & Reprezents album new Forms.

Give us a sense of the music scene where you are based.

I spend my time between Exeter and Bristol. Both have unique scenes in their own way but the DNB scene (and overall music scene) in Bristol is unreal and probably only a close second to London. It’s home to loads of amazing artists who pioneered the scene and helped get it to where it is today and are still big like Roni Size, Krust, Bryan Gee, TC, DMinds and Break to name a few so a great place to be for DNB.

What key pieces of software/gear are you using to define your sound?

Serum and Massive are my go-to synths which I pretty much do all my sound design with. I'm also a big fan of the Fab Filter plugins particularly Pro-Q3 and I also have to mention Trash-2 which is a beast of a distortion plugin.

What are some of your key musical influences?

In DNB, Artists like Noisia, Camo & Krooked, Mefjus and Break are really inspiring. Their production is next level and definitely inspire me to push myself and if I ever get close to their level, I'll be more than happy. Outside of DNB I try and listen to as much music across multiple genres which helps keeps things fresh and helps with inspiration and creativity.

What kind of relationship do you have with the internet? How does this inform your artistic expression?

The internet is paramount to my artistic expression. If I'm not producing, I'm trawling for samples on sights like Splice or reading up on the latest gear/production techniques on Computer Music Magazine. Lots of time has to be spent on social media these days building your fan base which is a bit of a chore but a necessary one.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

I make music for the love of it so getting my songs released and hearing that people enjoy listening to them is success to me.

What has been a memorable highlight of your career so far?

This EP is released on Nu Venture Records is definitely my highlight so far. I've had some really good feedback on the songs so looking forward to getting it out there.

If you could work with, or perform alongside any artist of your choice, who would it be?

Definitely a tough one, but I'd have to say Andy C or Chase and Status.

If you weren't a musician what would you be?

Would definitely have to be involved with the scene in some way so I'd say a promoter or events organiser.

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?

Yeah, I've got lots in the works at the mo - A couple of remixes, a Neuro DNB EP, a liquid DNB EP and some Collab’s so expected a lot more from me this year :)


Follow Perplex  online
Soundcloud | Instagram | Facebook
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Thursday, 19 March 2020

Interview with music producer ALLFLAWS



Bristol-based producer Allflaws is an electronic, industrial and trip hop project created in 2004 by producer, vocalist and songwriter Gabriel Curran. He  is the only official member of Allflaws and is completely responsible for its direction.

The Allflaws sound fuses an eclectic range of electronic genres and is built primarily around the rapping and singing of Gabriel but since the arrival of Allflaws, they  have gained respect as one of the most progressive British underground acts and have been mentioned in the same breath as ‘Bristol Sound’ prodigies Massive Attack, Portishead, Roni Size and Tricky.

See our exclusive interview with Gabriel Curran below


Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

As a teenager I really got into hip hop and became pretty obsessed with it. At the time it just seemed like it was the most rebellious and edgy music out there. It had an attitude and it was so creative and different at the time. It was the first music to come along since punk that really put a middle finger up to the establishment and questioned the way things were politically and socially.  In particular I loved Public Enemy for their raw, discordant and subversive sounds and lyrics. Then a few years into that I started broadening my music experience and listening to other genres like industrial, rock, trip hop, breakbeat and jungle. All of this informed my sound when I started producing music.

Give us a sense of the music scene where you are based.

I'm from Bristol. Home of musicians like Massive Attack, Portishead, Roni Size, Smith and Mighty, and of course the street artist Banksy. It's a great city for music, art and nightlife. The Bristol sound is pretty well known for its deep and dark dubby bass lines. I definitely think that aspect has crept into my music.

What key pieces of software/gear are you using to define your sound?

Ableton is my weapon of choice for producing tracks. It's' great for brainstorming ideas and getting them down quickly. I also try to use as much analog equipment as I can to keep my music making experience organic and hands on. That said it's all about the results. You can have the best studio equipment in the world but without imagination and ability it's hard to make something good. So I'm more inclined to have less equipment these days so that I challenge myself to think more creatively with the tools that I have.

What are some of your key musical influences?

My god this could be an endless list. Here goes anyway.

Nine Inch Nails, Public Enemy, Cypress Hill, Henry Rollins, Nirvana, Pink Floyd, Radiohead, Massive Attack, Portishead, The Verve, Talk Talk, Happy Mondays, Roni Size, The The, Rage Against The Machine, EL- P, Wu Tang Clan, House Of Pain, Incubus, Tricky, Deftones, Unkle, DJ Krush, Sneaker Pimps, The Prodigy, Aphex Twin, Goldie and loads more

What kind of relationship do you have with the internet? How does this inform your artistic expression?

I think the internet is totally great if used wisely. It's just a huge digital library of resources and learning. These days It's such a vital and necessary tool to disseminate music, and without it you will find it hard to get an audience. It really allows artists to bypass the corporate oligarchs of the industry and go directly to the fan base. This is so empowering and liberating and really puts artists in control of their material. This has definitely helped my artistic expression as I've really been able to exercise my creativity with no restraints, and get my music out to the people.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

I would like to make music that is in some way timeless, and that is still being listened to after I have gone. That to me is a great achievement for any artist. It kind of leaves a piece of that person around long after they have passed away. Doing that with a piece of music is amazing. Sounds a bit pretentious but It kind of immortalizes that artist and keeps a bit of their soul left behind for others to experience.

Success for me is actively following my true path and passion.  It's the act of actually doing it and making it, and not worrying about getting commercial validation or notoriety.
In my mind if I'm making and creating then I am successful.


What has been a memorable highlight of your career so far?

Making enough money from record sales to pay the rent and bills and quit the 9 til 5. That to me was like landing on the f.....king moon lol

If you could work with, or perform alongside any artist of your choice, who would it be?

It would have to be Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails. A true visionary and genius in my eyes.

If you weren't a musician what would you be?

I'm really not sure. I can't imagine doing anything else as music is so deeply ingrained in me.
However I am a very focused and driven person, and I do like having a passion or something to strive for. So whatever it would be, I would give it my all and try to master it as much as possible.

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?

Lots of new music videos are coming out for the latest album “Mysterium”, an Allflaws documentary is underway, plus some new singles and EPs will be released this year on Derelict State Records.

Follow ALLFLAWS online
Website | Facebook |  Twitter

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IIja Alexander’s original song ‘Someday’ gets an official remix


IIja Alexander has shared the future bass remix of his song ‘Someday’ via Green Monk Records. The original version was produced by Alexander, Curtis Richardson (Jennifer Lopez, Rihanna, Joss Stone) and Adien Lewis (Taemin, SHINee, NCT Dream). The mix was executed by  Matt Wiggins (U2, Adele, Lorde) and the master by Randy Merrill (Taylor Swift, Liam Gallagher, Lady Gaga). The ‘Someday’ original music video has been featured in acclaimed publications like CLASH Magazine, EARMILK, and Medium. Alexander has received immense support in Indonesia in Cosmopolitan Magazine and CLEO Magazine. Another previous single of his ranked at number 1 in Indonesia for the Ardan Radio chart.

Alexander was raised in Amsterdam but has relocated to London, where he has started his own band recently. The singer-songwriter finds inspiration in a wide variety of musical eras, some of his favourite musicians that he has mentioned are the Electric Light Orchestra, The Libertines, John Lennon, Paul Mc Cartney, The Beach Boys, and Burt Bacharach. As a child, seeing his father play Beethoven's Für Elise, Alexander decided to join in playing on the piano. His siblings and himself would become invested in music production during their high school days. During an exchange program in Osaka, it was made clear to Alexander that he was talented, as people would compliment his music. This led Alexander to follow a musical career.

Speaking on the remix, Alexander adds, "After I first got a listen to the ‘Someday’ Remix, I thought: "Wow, amazed to see that my song and sound can be converted into a future bass dance remix!". I never considered the possibilities of remixes, until the ‘Someday’ Remix."





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Monday, 20 January 2020

Interview with music producer Cardiohud



Music producer Nikita Nikitin, aka Cardiohud, was born in Transnistria, a post-USSR territory, before moving to Moscow at the age of eighteen to work as a software engineer.

It was around this time that Cardiohud developed his passion for electronic music.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

I grew up with parents listening mainly to the mainstream bullshit that they were broadcasting on tv. Music never really excited me, until I started taking the breakdance classes. Music playing there was usually some sort of old school American hip-hop and breakbeat, we were learning to feel the groove and I reckon that's how I developed a passion for syncopated rhythms.

Being in my early teens, we were getting together with friends at evenings listening to hip-hop and practising c-walk dance moves. We denied every type of music that was not American hip-hop. It was sort of a subculture. We tried to mimic the clothing style, the slang they used in songs, watching all the movies/documentaries we could put our hands-on, in our non-existent country.

Things changed for me after watching a movie called Hustle & Flow. I became very curious about how do these people create music. The next day I went to a shop and bought a CD with hip-hop ejay 4, that was my first take on creating music. It was indeed difficult for me to figure out all that stuff on my own, being 14 years old without knowing any English. But, trial and error, I moved over to hip-hop ejay 6, then have figured out how fruity loops work. slowly the picture of "how-to" become more clear.

Give us a sense of the music scene where you are based.

I live in Berlin now. the scene is extremely diverse here. Without even looking at the Resident Advisor events list, there is a guarantee that you will find a party with great music. People I was listening to and thinking "oh my god this is genius" are playing here every weekend. Sometimes, checking out the events list, I hope that there will be no favourite artist playing this weekend, just a reason to stay home and make music - it never works out this way. I doubt the scene can be any better anywhere else. I almost never travel somewhere else for partying.

What key pieces of software/gear are you using to define your sound?

I use DAW primarily to create music. I have some hardware in my home studio: a few weird gears, but mostly groove boxes - but I only use these gears as a tool to synthesize sounds and then process it on the computer.

I heavily use software for creative processing, I love to twist the sounds in and out to get new exciting results - I have the total bundle from media productions, which is insanely good.

the DAW I use is called Bitwig - the best choice for sound designers. It has the features Ableton can dream about, like all sorts of different modulators that I can apply to external vst plugins or even to the hardware in my studio. Plus it has a built-in digital modular environment. sick stuff, quite buggy tho.

Sometimes I do hardware only jams, that I record and chop or process somehow afterwards. For that matter, I love using octatrack and analogue rhythm, together with a-8, processed by Elektron analogue heat.

What are some of your key musical influences?

My root music is hip-hop. I was listening to it for many years and went through all sorts of hip-hop: starting with gangsta rap, crank music, rapcore, dirty south moving towards mumble and emo-rap. At some point, the amount of these “Lil” and “Yungs” became overwhelming for me. The music started to sound to me exactly the same and I gave up on listening to hip-hop and making beats, until now.

At the moment I am heavily inspired by everything Lee Gamble is doing. everything I love has crossed together for me in his music. The same effect on me had A Guy Called Gerald, Burial, Jan Jelinek, Bjarki, Noer the Boy, Forest Drive West and some others.

I would say the genres that influence my music today the most are jungle, dub, ambient, techno and UK garage.

What kind of relationship do you have with the internet? How does this inform your artistic expression?

I have pretty weird relations with the internet nowadays. I am a software engineer, in the first place, and I love everything what's about computers. I think I understand the power that the internet brings to us, I understand the importance of it in the modern world. The world would be a different place without it. But also I see what's happening to our society: people living for likes and follows, trying to look different from what they are. I think we are drowning on the internet today, we are helpless without it. Internet services are fighting for stealing our attention for as much as they possibly can and they do it successfully. I learn to be a digital minimalist, sit less at the phone, only use it when needed.

Though, with technology developing, more new cool perspectives appear. A friend of mine is running a network of servers collecting the images over the internet. Then this data is fed to a neural network that generates various images. I think the same can be done with music, soon AI will be competing with us in creating music. This is exciting, but also a bit scary.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

Success to me is the ability to be free when creating. Share the work with like-minded people. Collaborate on the art projects of various disciplines.

For me it's all about art. Maybe I am naive, but I don't set goals to become financially successful with music  - for me music is a medium which I can express myself through.

What has been a memorable highlight of your career so far?
I would highlight a soundtrack I made, for an exhibition of generative art, that my friend's hosted in Berlin. It was indeed an interesting challenge for me because I've made the whole soundtrack in a pretty short time. The idea behind the project was the computer-generated art, so I decided to use the digital modular environments and try to make the music "generative". I played with note probabilities, midi trigger chances, randomness and other methods to make the synthesizers create music for me. On that project, I also managed to work with a great mezzo-soprano singer - Rebecca Jo Loeb. You can find the soundtrack here - https://soundcloud.com/cardiohud/dopamine-harvest

If you could work with, or perform alongside any artist of your choice, who would it be?

I'd like to work with Lee Gamble. I think I would learn a lot from him. His music conveys a feeling you get at the peak of a techno rave in a sweaty basement through the medium of dub and ambient music. Woah. not only this, he is a great storyteller. Telling a story with music is very important. It's a freedom of exploration, playing with form.

To me, his music conveys a sense of nothingness, imperceptible mood. This is something I am really inspired by. I also saw him at Atonal this year, performing live. I went home jawless.

If you weren't a musician what would you be?

I would still be sticking around something creative somehow. Engineering some weird software, taking analogue pictures, making generative visual art, doing typography. I still want to do all of that, but currently I am focused on music.

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?

I am in the process of searching and defining my personal style. I spend virtually all of my spare time behind a monitor tweaking knobs, figuring out what is it that I would like to share with people. But I am planning on doing more releases in the upcoming years because I feel more confident with the music I am producing today.


Follow Cardiohud online 
Soundcloud | Facebook | Bandcamp
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Interview with music composer Foreign Shores



After picking up the sticks at a young age, London-based music producer Foreign Shores quickly became hooked on the fast-paced sounds of drum & bass.

Studying music in the States allowed him to fine-tune his craft and 2020 looks to be a breakout year with multiple releases in the pipeline.

Get to know Foreign Shores below:

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

My earliest entry into music appreciation would have been seven years old when I came down on Christmas morning to find a drum kit. This sparked a musical revolution for me and I became fixated on anything with exciting drum work. As soon as I heard drum & bass for the first time I was hooked, I must have been about fifteen when I snuck into my first D&B night. I got into music production at University in The States six years ago. Studying Music Tech and working with other like-minded people really allowed me to express myself through my music.

Give us a sense of the music scene where you are based.

I’m based in London so there is literally a gig every single night of the week. I try and make it out to something new every week & diversify my musical taste as much as possible so that I stay inspired.

What key pieces of software/gear are you using to define your sound?

2 keys pieces stick out for me. Ableton Live with the Push - This allows me to quickly lay down ideas & also keeps writing in a DAW hands on.

My Korg M1 is used in every single track without fail, the sounds that it produces are unlike anything else and some of the sound cards I have are a real treasure.

Favourite soft synth is 100% Serum.

What are some of your key musical influences?

Key influences include The Prodigy, Camo & Krooked, Sub Focus, Andy C & Dawn Wall. All for different reasons but all very important.

What kind of relationship do you have with the internet? How does this inform your artistic expression?

I don't spend much time on the internet outside of browsing for new music on Soundcloud or Spotify. I often turn to Youtube to browse for something interesting that could be sampled or give me a creative spark.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

Success for me would be getting to play my music out on a consistent basis and seeing happy people out there dancing to my tunes and enjoying themselves.

What has been a memorable highlight of your career so far?

The biggest highlight so far has got to be releasing my debut single via NVR & hearing it played out on BBC Introducing

If you could work with, or perform alongside any artist of your choice, who would it be?

I would love to work with Camo & Krooked - Their sound is unlike anyone else.

If you weren't a musician what would you be?

James Bond always appealed to me...

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?

I've got a few more releases coming up via NVR & a remix or two ready to go. Hopefully, this can build some momentum and I’ll get to play these tracks out.


Follow foreign Shores online 

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Wednesday, 18 December 2019

Meet the future bass collaborative duo Esofact with their latest song


Hailing from California and Los Angeles respectfully, Urple Eeple (Peter Farr) and Isturite (Kevin Welch) have come together to make future bass music that transcends boundaries. The two have just released their latest single, ‘Blocks’ via Farr’s own label, Chillage Records. The track was released last Friday and is lifted off of their upcoming self titled EP, due for release in 2020.

While the two have both made names for themselves independently in the music industry, they still have a long history together. Having met during their teenage years and bonding over the festival scene, they eventually decided to collaborate and began releasing music in 2014. While a great pairing from the start, we’ve had the chance to see how the two have come to grow together, bringing their own external influences together in harmony.

Curious about some of this growth process, we knew we had to learn more about the two. You can too, in our exclusive interview below.

Looking back, what were some of your earliest entries into music appreciation? And music production?

Kevin: I was a band geek in school, I played saxophone and guitar, and listened to a lot of hip hop, metal. I didn’t even consider using a computer for music until I a few years after I started raving back in 06. I’d say my first taste of wanting to produce my own music was when I was introduced to glitch music through Memekest, who unfortunately is no longer releasing content.

Peter: I played guitar and piano from a very early age, and played in a number of unsuccessful bands in my youth. Music has always been a huge part of my life. When I turned eighteen I drove myself out to Burning Man, which was a deeply life-changing experience for me at the time.  I started producing electronic music and was influenced early on by wonky beat music, and the LA beat scene.  The shows that Low End theory used to put on were hugely influential and inspirational to me as a producer.

Give us a sense of the music scene where you are based.

The west coast music scene is very different from the rest of the world.  In Northern California, there’s a lot of bass music which starts to become pretty formulaic.  In Southern California, there’s a heavy influence from the LA beat scene - Low End Theory, Flying Lotus (adult swim) which is more on the experimental side. Lately, there’s been a bigger rise in future bass/future beats which is more on our personal vibe and what we enjoy making.

What key pieces of software/gear are you using to define your sound?

Analog gear is a huge part of our creative process.  On this album, we heavily used the Prophet-6, Moog Mother-32, Elektron and found sounds.  We love really organic sounds as well, and heavily use samples of objects in the real world to add texture and dimension to our music.  As for software we tend to be pretty big fans of Diva and Serum.

What are some of your key musical influences?

Flume, Com Truise, Ekali, Flying Lotus, Tennyson, 20syl and many many more.

You’ve mentioned that you went to festivals together as teenagers. What are some of your best memories of these times?

Some great memories from festivals - stumbling upon Amon Tobin at Symbiosis 09 because we were woken up by the heavy bass waves.  Come over the main stage and were completely blown away by his entire performance.  That festival was amazing through and through - including an absolutely mind-blowing performance from Lazer Sword (live hardware) and a live acoustic glitch set from The Glitch Mob (not their main performance).  Other fond festival memories include seeing Seventh Swami at the lobster carnival and dressing up as lobsters for an impromptu fashion show in the forest.

What are your favourite tracks from your upcoming self-titled EP?

Our favourite track is probably Blocks, with Honey Drip as a close second.  Overall we feel very proud of the entire EP and it is hard to pick favourites!

What kind of relationship do you have with the internet? How does this inform your artistic expression?

The internet. It’s a double-edged sword. The good side of it are the endless resources for artists to learn, and perfect their craft. Software choices are endless, and there is a never ending supply of tutorials. The downside we think is society's addiction to social media. As an artist, your social media presence is almost more important than your music itself, as far as bookings are concerned which is a real drag. We imagine there are likely some incredible artists out there that don’t get heard because they might not be skilled at gaming social media. It’s a way that fans can follow along with an artist's life, but it also gets in the way of what’s really important - the music.

What would you like to achieve with your music? What does success look like to you?

We just want to make awesome music and play some fun shows. Success to us would be releasing another album in 2020 and getting a chance to collaborate or share a stage with some of our favorite artists.

What has been a memorable highlight of your career so far?

Playing large festivals has been a huge highlight of our shared artistic career with Esofact, and putting out some songs we feel very proud of.  As this is our debut EP, I think this is a very big highlight for us. We’ve put a ton of work into this EP and feel very proud of the entire thing. We hope we can get it into as many ears as possible so others can enjoy it!

If you could work with, or perform alongside any artist of your choice, who would it be?

Ekali, Flume, Com Truise, Flying Lotus, Shigeto, Tennyson, Datasette and countless other artists that we have immense respect and admiration for.

If you weren't a musician what would you be?

We will always be musicians.  Even if music doesn’t “work out” as far as being a prime moneymaker we will never stop making music. That’s such a core part of our respective identities, we don’t think we could ever give that up completely.

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?

We are releasing our debut EP soon!




Follow Esofact:

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Thursday, 12 December 2019

'20 Years of fabric' celebrates London's iconic venue


Using the platform of fabric and FABRICLIVE that the London club have lovingly nurtured over the past 20 years, fabric Records present the past and future with 20 artists across 20 tracks, for the 20th Anniversary celebration of the beating heart of EC1.

1999: the beginning of the story. 1,000 weekends and 3,000 events, together with a seminal CD series that wrapped up last year with closing instalments from fabric residents Craig Richards and Terry Francis with club founder Keith Reilly, alongside London underground innovators Burial & Kode9 for FABRICLIVE. This special 20th Anniversary release reflects the history of the club from the very beginning to the current crop of residents. Here you’ll find artists who helped shape the sound of the club, grew up in the club, have been inspired by the club and have become part of the fabric family.

FABRICLIVE represents the finest in dubstep, drum & bass, jungle, breaks and experimental beats. Houndstooth’s Special Request leads the charge in trademark style, opening the floor to Friday night luminaries Source Direct and J Majik. Shackleton and Pinch & Trim started playing the club during the birth of the UK dubstep scene and give a taste of the hugely disparate evolution of bass music. Daniel Avery and B.Traits show off their dancefloor versatility, while Rupture co-founder Mantra plants a flag for London’s vibrant musical future. Closing are two of the club's longest associates Groove Armada and original FABRICLIVE resident James Lavelle as UNKLE.

fabric has been responsible for nurturing the underground London house and techno scene, inspiring and revolutionising the clubbing landscape by confidently proving that you don’t have to book commercial acts to be a success. The breadth of talent here displays the far reaching arms of the night - with an opening spread of melodic techno from Nina Kraviz, the shuddering electro of Steffi, and evolving experimental house of Margaret Dygas. New resident IMOGEN veers things in a darker direction towards Cassy’s pumping house and Marcel Dettmann’s classic late-night techno. Anastasia Kristensen drives ahead while Houndstooth’s Call Super takes things down a deeper notch with a track reminiscent of many a classic night in room 3, and Maya Jane Coles steps up with a playful slice of house. British dance music pioneer Sasha closes out on a euphoric high with layers of building vocal and melody.

NEVER NOT MAKING NOISE.
fabric
1/ A1 - Nina Kraviz - Da [fabric]
2/ A2 - Steffi - Ankertje [fabric]
3/ A3 - IMOGEN – Bizant [fabric]
4/ B1 - Marcel Dettmann - Taste 2.0 [fabric]
5/ B2 - Cassy - Joey [fabric]
6/ B3 - Anastasia Kristensen - Go Getter [fabric]
7/ C1 - Margaret Dygas - Zeitgeist [fabric]
8/ C2 - Call Super – Echothread [fabric]
9/ D1 - Maya Jane Coles - Reason [fabric]
10/ D2 - Sasha - Comet Chaser [fabric]

FABRICLIVE
1/ A1 - Special Request - Codename Turbo Nutter [FABRICLIVE]
2/ A2 - Source Direct – Vigilante [FABRICLIVE]
3/ B1 - J. Majik - The Lost Tribe [FABRICLIVE]
4/ B2 - Shackleton - Drawn and Quartered [FABRICLIVE]
5/ B3 - Pinch & Trim - That Wasn't It [FABRICLIVE]
6/ C1 - Daniel Avery - Whilst We've Got Metal In Our Blood [FABRICLIVE]
7/ C2 - Mantra – Embers [FABRICLIVE]
8/ C3 - B.Traits – Mameya [FABRICLIVE]
9/ D1 - Groove Armada - Wesley Nightshade [FABRICLIVE]
10/ D2 - UNKLE - Catch Me When I Fall (fabric Club Mix) [FABRICLIVE]

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